Digital Artworks by Stuart Lippincott

Immerse yourself in the dark and futuristic world of Stuart Lippincott, an American artist and designer who has been creating a new picture every day for a couple of years now.

By Balthazar Malevolent

Digital Artworks by Stuart Lippincott

For a couple of years now, Arizona-based artist Stuart Lippincott — aka stuz0r on Instagram — has been challenging himself to create a unique digital illustration every single day.

The incredible imaginary worlds and scenarios created by Lippincott often feel somewhat connected, or even part of a much bigger, intriguing story that we can’t wait to discover.

You said that when you started you were using Maya — and then Lightwave and Cinema 4d. How did that change come about?

S: Yeah, I began learning 3d using Maya, which I believe many people say is the most confusing software there is. The interface is pretty confusing I guess to most people, which I can understand as you have to hold down the space bar to bring up all these different menus and sub-menus and stuff, but I got used to it and it wasn’t until I was in an advertising agency where one of my friends was like, “Dude, you’ve got to try out Cinema (4d), man, it’s so much easier, and it can render really fast.” This was in 2010. And so, I tried it out, and the user interface was a lot more simplified, but it had everything there that you needed at the time, and the rendering was much faster as well. So I stuck with it from there and decided to learn it.

Did you find because it was more simplified that it was easier to experiment and play around with things in a more efficient way?

S: Yeah, it seems that maybe it is a software more geared towards designers, whereas Maya is more generally associated with movies — it’s very technical, there’s a parameter for everything — which is nice if you know what you are doing. I don’t have a whole lot of experience with 3ds Max — I’ve always heard that is kind of gaming oriented. I’ve used it a little bit, but Cinema is just, well, when you first open it, you don’t feel overwhelmed. You feel like you can get into it and feel comfortable with it, at least I did when starting out.

Could you expand on how Instagram has helped you get work? You said around 95% of the new work you get is from people who saw your work there.

S: It is a saturation thing, I guess. I think of IG as a portfolio — of course it helps to have a good following which is like word-of-mouth — but I got into the whole freelance thing doing work with a band called Illenium. I did some album art for him and from there it spread throughout the music community. And then people were coming to my IG to look through my images and sometimes they would buy one that I had already made and others would want something similar to an existing images, but with some tweaks. It is a great portfolio. And they can see a huge body of work you’ve done and not everything is going to be awesome on there. But you know, it’s funny, because sometimes something to me that is really awesome, that I really like a lot on there, might actually be horrible. And sometimes things on there that I do that I think are super stupid just go absolutely insane. So you just never really know. Everyone likes different things, but it’s a great way to get your stuff out there.

Your work has a strong science fiction element to it. Could you elaborate on that?

S: It’s interesting — I have always gravitated towards strong lighting, dramatic lighting. You know PostPanic? Well, they made the OFFF titles back in 2010. They put out something called Year Zero and I saw this back when I was getting started in Cinema (4d) and it blew my mind. It was kind of a mix between Nine Inch Nails and Half-life 2. And then they made another short film a couple years later called Sundays, and that also heavily influenced what I do. And then of course there is Blade Runner, Star Wars, Star Trek….I’ve always been into sci-fi stuff. And to be honest, back in 2016 when I saw Mike’s (Beeple) stuff, I thought, this is freaking sweet. So really it is just a combination of all these things and it just stuck. I really like this style of work.

Is there any advice you could give from your experience about how to market yourself — since, as an individual, you are depending on your visibility on social media to get work?

S: Well, back when I was starting, the everyday thing was just taking off, so I don’t want to just say, “start an everyday project” since the market there is really saturated, but to give a simplistic answer, that is actually what I would suggest. I don’t have some secret marketing formula to be honest, I just got lucky.

So this is how it got started for me: I started posting my stuff, and there is this site called The Graphics Project, and they started re-posting some of my work, just happenstance. Then I started getting more followers because of that. And then Motion Designers started posting my stuff, and then Empire Future — so these huge pages with insane amounts of followers. So it’s a “if you throw enough stuff against the wall, something’s gonna stick” type of thing. But there will of course be people who are saying there is too much of this crap and too much of this everyday stuff going on…..which is true, sure, but go ahead and do it anyway. You can see your progress, your work will be out there, and you know, hashtag it.

Stuart Lippincott

In other news, Rick Owens Fall 2021 fashion show. On the subject of underthings, the pentagram briefs from the January men’s show reappeared here wrapped around evening clutches, the implication being that these alien females had handled the “unhinged male aggression” that those briefs signified.

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